Zeolites
SpiritRock Shop
Museum Specimens
Click on any photo to see a larger version
Official PayPal Seal
Item #1ZE10141050
Stilbite Sheafs from Aurangabad, India

$21.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Stilbite Sheafs from Aurangabad,
India
This specimen weighs 4.5oz, or 0.29 lb (132 g)
and measures
3.2 x 3.1 x 1.4 inches  (8.1 x 7.8 x 3.6cm)
Heat water and you'll see steam rise as it comes to a boil. You can get the same thing to happen if you heat a unique
rock called a Zeolite, which traps water inside itself.  In 1756 a Swedish Geologist named Axel Cronstedt (1722–
1765…best known as the discoverer of nickel), observed this unique characteristic and gave these rocks the name
"Zeolite".  The name comes from the Greek words (zéō), meaning "to boil" and (líthos), meaning "stone".  












"Zeolite-ZSM-5-3D-vdW". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons -
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Zeolite-ZSM-5-3D-vdW.png#mediaviewer/File:Zeolite-ZSM-5-3D-vdW.png

We need to understand the physical make up to explain what unique features Zeolites have. Zeolites are micro porous
crystalline solids with well-defined structures. They will normally contain silicon, aluminum and oxygen in their solid
structure and cations*, water and other molecules in their open pores. *(An ion is an atom or group of atoms in which the
number of electrons is not equal to the number of protons, giving it a net positive or negative electrical charge. An anion
is an ion that is negatively charged, and is attracted to the anode or the positive electrode in electrolysis. A cation has a
net positive charge, and is attracted to the cathode or the negative electrode during electrolysis.) Many occur naturally
as minerals, and are extensively mined in many parts of the world. Others are man-made synthetics, and are made
commercially for specific uses.

Because of their unique porous properties, zeolites are used in a variety of applications and are often referred to as
molecular sieves.  Some of the major uses of Zeolites are in petrochemical cracking (the process whereby complex
organic molecules such as kerogens or heavy hydrocarbons are broken down into simpler molecules), ion-exchange
(water softening and purification), and in the separation and removal of gases and solvents.
Zeolites are stable solids that resist environmental conditions that degrade many other materials. They are not affected
by high pressures or temperatures, they don't burn, they will not dissolve in water or inorganic solvents, and they will not
oxidize in the air. They're not believed to cause any health problems or harm the environment. Zeolites stable and
unreactive nature is not what makes them so useful.

The unique thing about zeolites is their ability to trap other molecules inside their micro porous crystalline structure which
is a cage-like or framed type of structure. This is how water molecules and alkali or alkaline-Earth metal ions
(sometimes called cations) become a part of zeolite crystals.  Zeolites can trade other positively charged ions for the
metal ions originally trapped inside them. This is known as cation exchange and as Cronstedt found over 250 years
ago; they can gain or lose their water molecules very easily too (this is known as reversible dehydration). Zeolites have
fixed sizes of openings in them which let small molecules pass through but trap larger ones, acting as molecular sieves.
Natural Zeolites occur in random forms and mixed sizes. Man-made Zeolites are manufactured to a specific  size to trap
molecules of a certain (smaller) size inside them.

Zeolites help to provide a cleaner, safer environment. Most uses of Zeolites are the result of efforts to meet
environmental concerns by reducing toxic waste and energy consumption.  Zeolites have replaced harmful phosphate
builders in laundry detergent. Phosphate builders have been banned in many parts of the world because of water
pollution potential risks. Zeolites are also used as catalysts which make chemical processes more efficient, saving
energy and reducing pollution, waste and by-products. Zeolites can also be used as solid acids which reduce the need
for corrosive liquid acids. Zeolites can also be used as redox (reduction and oxidation electron exchange processes,
reduction is the gain of electrons, oxidation is the loss of electrons) catalysts and sorbents that can remove atmospheric
pollutants, such as engine exhaust gases and ozone-depleting CFCs. Zeolites can also be used to remove harmful
organics and heavy metal ions such as those produced during nuclear fission from water.
Analcime family:
Analcime
Pollucite
Wairakite
Bellbergite
Bikitaite
Boggsite
Brewsterite
Chabazite family:
Chabazite
Willhendersonite
Cowlesite
Dachiardite
Edingtonite
Epistilbite
Erionite
Faujasite
Ferrierite
Gismondine family:
Amicite
Garronite
Gismondine
Gobbinsite
Gmelinite
Gonnardite
Goosecreekite
Harmotome family:
Harmotome
Phillipsite
Wellsite
Heulandite family:
Clinoptilolite
Heulandite
Laumontite
Levyne
Mazzite
Merlinoite
Montesommaite
Mordenite
Natrolite family:
Mesolite
Natrolite
Scolecite
Offretite
Paranatrolite
Paulingite
Perlialite
Stilbite family:
Barrerite
Stilbite
Stellerite
Thomsonite
Tschernichite
Yugawaralite
Minerals In The Zeolites Group of 7 Families
Zeolites are a beautiful group of rare and complex crystal minerals for collectors. These are naturally formed in the
cavities (vesicles) of volcanic rocks. Zeolites are Metamorphic Rocks.  Some Zeolites form with subtle amounts of heat
and pressure, marginally being called metamorphic, while others are found in classic metamorphic formations. Some
of the most popular collectible Zeolites come from the Deccan Traps in India. There are 7 families of Zeolites as shown
here. Some minerals  such as Apophyllite and Okenite, are not Zeolites but are often found in combination with
Zeolites, and sometimes erroneously referred to as Zeolites
Item #CSZE09168585
Chabazite Crystals with Stellerite from
the Sokolovskiy Mine, Kazakhstan

$125.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2008 Tucson Gem & Mineral Show in Arizona. Very
rare specimen of Chabazite with Stellerite from a highly sought after location.
This specimen weighs 2.2oz, or 0.13 lb (62.5g)
and measures 2.7 x 1.8 x 0.9 inches  (6.8 x 4.6 x 2.3cm)
Item #4ZE10144050
Peach Stilbite from Jalgaon, India

$21.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Peach Stilbite from Jalgaon, India

This specimen weighs 5oz, or 0.31 lb (142 g)
and measures
3.2 x 2.6 x 1.5 inches  (8.2 x 6.7 x 4 cm)
Item #5ZE10145050
Heulandite and  Stilbite from
Nasik, India

$25.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Heulandite and Stilbite from Nasik,
India
This specimen weighs 5.6oz, or 0.35 lb (159 g)
and measures
3 x 2.2 x 1.3 inches  (7.6 x 5.7 x 3.5 cm)
Item #6ZE10146050
Stilbite from Aurangabad, India

$21.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Stilbite from Aurangabad, India
This specimen weighs 6oz, or 0.37 lb (171 g)
and measures
3.3 x 2.7 x 1.1 inches  (8.5 x 7 x 2.8 cm)
Item #7ZE10147050
Rare Stilbite Plates on Chalcedony
from Jalgaon, India

$39.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Rare Stilbite Plates on Chalcedony
from Jalgaon, India
This specimen weighs 5.5oz, or 0.34 lb (157 g)
and measures
3.9 x 2.6 x 1.6 inches  (10 x 6.6 x 4.2 cm)
Item #8ZE10148050
Peach Stilbite Sheafs from Jalgaon,
India

$27.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Peach Stilbite Sheafs from Jalgaon,
India
This specimen weighs 10.1oz, or 0.63 lb (287 g)
and measures
3.7 x 3.3 x 2.4 inches  (9.6 x 8.4 x 6.2 cm)
M.A.G.M.A.
Mountain Area Gem and Mineral Association
Item #9ZE10149050
Stellerite from Aurangabad, India

$25.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Stellerite from Aurangabad, India
This specimen weighs 3.3oz, or 0.21 lb (96 g)
and measures
3.5 x 2.5 x 0.9 inches  (9.1 x 6.4 x 2.2 cm)
Item #10ZE101410050
Stilbite from Jalgaon, India

$19.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Stilbite from Jalgaon, India
This specimen weighs 5.3oz, or 0.33 lb (153 g)
and measures
3.2 x 2.5 x 1.4 inches  (8.2 x 6.5 x 3.7cm)
Item #11ZE101411050
Apophyllite and Peach Stilbite from
Jalgaon, India

$25.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Apophyllite and Peach Stilbite from
Jalgaon, India
This specimen weighs 8.1oz, or 0.51 lb (231 g)
and measures
3.7 x 2.4 x 1.7 inches  (9.4 x 6.2 x 4.4 cm)
Item #12ZE101412050
Heulandite Crystals in matrix from
Aurangabad, India

$22.00
Zeolite Specimen from the 2014 M.A.G.M.A.
Gem & Mineral Show in Hiddenite, North
Carolina. Heulandite Crystals in matrix from
Aurangabad, India
This specimen weighs 5.5oz, or 0.34 lb (158g)
and measures
3.3 x 2.4 x 1.6 inches  (8.5 x 6 x 4.1 cm)
Item #GEOZE11148912
Rare Zeolite on matrix Geode from
Maharashtra, India

$59.00
This is a very rare geode with acicular
Goethite (hydrated Iron) crystals on a
Goethite cube crystal, stunning natrolite
crystal formations on a Pink quartz liner.
We procured this piece from a British
Mineral Dealer, who got it from a Sahara
Desert Mineral Dealer years ago. It is
reportedly from Maharashtra, Ahmadnagar
District in India. An excellent display
mineral from our personal collection.
This specimen weighs
2.4oz, or 0.14 lb (68g)
and measures
2.99 x 1.8 x 1.2 inches  (76 x 46 x 31 mm)